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Spanner Wrench for FJR


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#1 kiteflyer

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Posted 30 October 2011 - 05:17 PM

Needing to check the steering head bearings on my FJR, I stopped by Cycle Gear and picked up a "compact" spanner wrench to do the job. Great price on the wrench, but it doesn't fit. What the hell, I wanted to go riding anyway. Will a different size wrench fit the steering head bolt, or do I need to pony up and get a wrench from the dealer?

By the way, it was a GREAT day for ride through southwest Idaho this afternoon.

Keep the shiny side up -
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#2 Rheal

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Posted 31 October 2011 - 05:49 PM

Needing to check the steering head bearings on my FJR, I stopped by Cycle Gear and picked up a "compact" spanner wrench to do the job. Great price on the wrench, but it doesn't fit. What the hell, I wanted to go riding anyway. Will a different size wrench fit the steering head bolt, or do I need to pony up and get a wrench from the dealer?

By the way, it was a GREAT day for ride through southwest Idaho this afternoon.

Keep the shiny side up -
-Paul


I believe you are referring to the big nut on top of the triple crown right? I needed to remove that nut to install my GenMar risers last spring. I purchased a 3/8" drive socket (36 mm) to do the job. You should be able to get one for between $10 and $15, maybe less. Here in canada, canadian Tire has them for $11 plus change. I am sure that will be cheaper than a wrench from the Yamaha dealer.

It is pretty cool risdign here in Montreal now. Slightly below freezing in the morning (frost on the seat and windscreen) but nice days. Season is just about over. Oh Well!

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#3 LAF

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Posted 01 November 2011 - 05:28 AM

Someone from awhile ago on this Forum used to make them but not sure he is doing it any longer. I borrowed one and it was mailed to me and I mailed it back. I think you can go online and buy one from a dealer who gives 20% off. I am not sure if there is a home brewed one available from someone or not?

They are a bit expensive for as much as you would use one but the right tool for the job is very nice to have in your tool box.

EDIT: If you are referring to the 36MM go 12 point and not 6 as it will not scare up your 36MM nut as readily as a 6 point will.

#4 OCfjr

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Posted 01 November 2011 - 08:44 AM

The 36mm nut is just a cover for the actual nut that does the tightening of the fork bearings. And yes, you pretty much do need a special wrench to fit on there and be able to torque it through the process, which is to back it off, torque high, then back off and torque low. I'd have to dig the shop manual out for the specs.

I made my own from an adjustable spanner wrench, and it will do the job, but it's a PITA. I've used the Yamaha tool and one sold by aftermarket vendors that is identical and they do work easier/better.

Wish I had sprung for one of the sockets the forum guy was making, but that deal is over, IIRC.

Here is a nice walk through and shows the tool. LINK

Apparently this fits too, but it's spendy. LINK

Another nice walk through for a Gen I - LINK

Note that BikeJohnny has gone out of business.

K&L Supply makes the Yamaha tools and usually sells them for less, if you can find a K&L dealer near you. P?N is KL-0201D

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#5 kiteflyer

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Posted 01 November 2011 - 10:25 AM

Thanks guys. I've the 36mm socket for the big nut on top, but no luck with a spanner that fits the two holding things together. I'll try K&L and maybe even the dealer. It's a shame that it's so hard to find the tool to do such a simple job.

Cheers,
-Paul
The bikes: 1970 RS 350 Yamaha, 1972 125 Penton, 1973 250 Husqvarna, 1972 Norton 850 Commando, 1976 RD 400 Yamaha, 1983 Honda 900, 2010 Yamaha FJR1300

IBA# 53760

#6 Niehart

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Posted 01 November 2011 - 11:05 AM

PM just Roy. He might be ready to do another run of that socket tool. I would be intested if he does.

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#7 ionbeam

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Posted 01 November 2011 - 11:32 AM

...It's a shame that it's so hard to find the tool to do such a simple job...

If you want to pay for shipping to/from I've got a Yamaha clone tool that I could drop in the mail.
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#8 kiteflyer

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Posted 01 November 2011 - 12:45 PM


...It's a shame that it's so hard to find the tool to do such a simple job...

If you want to pay for shipping to/from I've got a Yamaha clone tool that I could drop in the mail.


The round trip shipping fron Hew Hampshire and Idaho might be more than the tool is worth. I'm still searching for options out west here. Thanks for the offer, it's greatly appreciated.

Cheers,
-Paul
The bikes: 1970 RS 350 Yamaha, 1972 125 Penton, 1973 250 Husqvarna, 1972 Norton 850 Commando, 1976 RD 400 Yamaha, 1983 Honda 900, 2010 Yamaha FJR1300

IBA# 53760

#9 kiteflyer

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Posted 01 November 2011 - 12:47 PM

PM just Roy. He might be ready to do another run of that socket tool. I would be intested if he does.


PM sent. Got an error message that his inbox was full and cannot receive any more PM's. I'll try again later.

Thanks,
-Paul
The bikes: 1970 RS 350 Yamaha, 1972 125 Penton, 1973 250 Husqvarna, 1972 Norton 850 Commando, 1976 RD 400 Yamaha, 1983 Honda 900, 2010 Yamaha FJR1300

IBA# 53760

#10 ionbeam

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Posted 01 November 2011 - 01:19 PM

PM sent. Got an error message that his inbox was full and cannot receive any more PM's. I'll try again late

His In Box has been full for a lloooonnnnggggg time and AFAIK hasn't responded to any email in that same length of time.
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#11 Jogle

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Posted 01 November 2011 - 04:16 PM

Try giving Vasteve a pm he has made a few if he still has one they are around $30.
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#12 LAF

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Posted 02 November 2011 - 06:12 AM



...It's a shame that it's so hard to find the tool to do such a simple job...

If you want to pay for shipping to/from I've got a Yamaha clone tool that I could drop in the mail.


The round trip shipping fron Hew Hampshire and Idaho might be more than the tool is worth. I'm still searching for options out west here. Thanks for the offer, it's greatly appreciated.

Cheers,
-Paul

It should not cost more than 5 bucks or so express mail. If it fits it ships! Even a CD pouch will do it.

I did borrow one the same way and it was worth the mail cost to get it done by me, right.

#13 worney

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Posted 02 November 2011 - 07:54 PM

I bought one off of eBay. check here $32 plus shipping. I wish that I had been around when the socket deal was on it looks much easier to torque correctly.

-worney
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Almost in the Rockies (but still too damn flat).

#14 kiteflyer

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Posted 03 November 2011 - 05:37 AM

Thanks Worney!

Great tip. I hadn't considered Ebay. I'm such a technology nerd.......:dribble:

Cheers,
-Paul
The bikes: 1970 RS 350 Yamaha, 1972 125 Penton, 1973 250 Husqvarna, 1972 Norton 850 Commando, 1976 RD 400 Yamaha, 1983 Honda 900, 2010 Yamaha FJR1300

IBA# 53760

#15 ionbeam

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Posted 03 November 2011 - 06:01 AM

[donning on my fire suit]

Unlike the exact FJR tool, the one from eBay lets you attach your torque wrench from several angles. In the picture below, note how the torque wrench is 90 to the claw tip of the spanner, you need to ensure that you keep this exact angular relationship for accurate torquing.

Picture from eBay so it may disappear pretty quickly.

Posted Image

[suit off]
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#16 LAF

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Posted 03 November 2011 - 04:35 PM

I bought one off of eBay. check here $32 plus shipping. I wish that I had been around when the socket deal was on it looks much easier to torque correctly.

-worney

Great find. Wish I only paid that for mine :-(

#17 worney

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Posted 03 November 2011 - 09:26 PM

I bought one off of eBay. check here $32 plus shipping. I wish that I had been around when the socket deal was on it looks much easier to torque correctly.

-worney


The seller now has on listed as an auction starting at $28 + free shipping here. Don't bid against one another and drive the price up! :lol:
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#18 OCfjr

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Posted 04 November 2011 - 06:02 AM

[donning on my fire suit]

Unlike the exact FJR tool, the one from eBay lets you attach your torque wrench from several angles. In the picture below, note how the torque wrench is 90° to the claw tip of the spanner, you need to ensure that you keep this exact angular relationship for accurate torquing.
[suit off]

I do understand the importance of keeping the tool in line with the wrench for proper torque application, but my torque wrenches are ratcheting style, so even the Yamaha/K&L tool can end up out of position. Just have to be careful is all. Not worth the cost of a good non-ratcheting torque wrench for the few times it would be handy, (to me).

For those playing along at home, what this means, and why Ionbeam is mentioning it, is that if the tool is at an angle, it multiplies the torque value above what it would be in direct line. It can be argued about how much importance this is for this particular application and the relatively low values in play. ;)

And worney - Thanks for the link, snapped that up this morning. Another one HERE.
Same seller, and he has another one for $32BIN too.

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#19 Fred W

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Posted 04 November 2011 - 06:39 AM

For those playing along at home, what this means, and why Ionbeam is mentioning it, is that if the tool is at an angle, it multiplies the torque value above what it would be in direct line. It can be argued about how much importance this is for this particular application and the relatively low values in play. ;)



Just to make this completely clear, you do want the torque wrench to be at an angle to the spanner. A 90 degree angle to be precise. You do not want it to be in-line.

If you place the wrench in-line with the spanner, the torque being applied (and registered) by the wrench will be amplified by the ratio of the length of the spanner to the length of the wrench. IOW you will over torque the nut. But at the prescribed 90 degrees relationship the torque applied to the nut is the same as what is read by the torque wrench.

This is clearly spelled out in the service manual.

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-Fred W        nerd.gif


 


#20 dcarver

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Posted 04 November 2011 - 06:46 AM

PM just Roy. He might be ready to do another run of that socket tool. I would be intested if he does.



PM sent. Got an error message that his inbox was full and cannot receive any more PM's. I'll try again late

His In Box has been full for a lloooonnnnggggg time and AFAIK hasn't responded to any email in that same length of time.


I don't think Roy is with us any longer - no reply back to email, and I know he was battling...

For those playing along at home, what this means, and why Ionbeam is mentioning it, is that if the tool is at an angle, it multiplies the torque value above what it would be in direct line. It can be argued about how much importance this is for this particular application and the relatively low values in play. ;)

Just to make this completely clear, you do want the torque wrench to be at an angle to the spanner. A 90 degree angle to be precise. You do not want it to be in-line.If you place the wrench in-line with the spanner, the torque being applied (and registered) by the wrench will be amplified by the ratio of the length of the spanner to the length of the wrench. IOW you will over torque the nut. But at the prescribed 90 degrees relationship the torque applied to the nut is the same as what is read by the torque wrench.This is clearly spelled out in the service manual.Posted Image

<metrology hat on>
Correct
</metrology hat off>
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