Jump to content


Photo

LD ride advice(leaving tomorrow)


  • Please log in to reply
32 replies to this topic

#1 fjrsochs

fjrsochs

    FJR Pilot

  • Members++
  • PipPipPip
  • 135 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:indiana
  • Bike: 2005 (Gen I) N. America

Posted 12 March 2012 - 12:22 AM

Greetings pilots,

Im about to do a mid country trip. Indiana to Colorado amd bacoverwrite 3days. I'm leaving today or tomorrow. Changing my oil before I leave. 2005 FJR with 20,000 mikes. Trio is 2,000 miles round. B
Don't yet have a top case. Just a quick visit to see a childhood friend for a day or so. Then back to my daily grind. If you have any advice to offer about 17hours straight one way, I'd love to hear it. I have done 1,500 in 36hours on my DL650 but not yet 17 str8 hours of riding. Usually only 8-10. My questions are

1. How much extra light,time do I have by driving west.

Its17 hour ride and I want to do it all at once. What time should I leave to get the most daylight at the end of  the day given the sunset ring in the west and the time changes? My first 350 mike ride was done from 3pm to 2am, but on interstates I travel four times per year. This ride west wil be the first time I've travel west of my city. I don't know what to expect of the road construction. Probably travel Evansville,IN to St. Louis,MO, Columbia,MO, Kansas, City to Topeka,Ks to Denver Colorado.I70

Option 2
Takes me a little northward. US36 Terra Haute,I72Springfield,IL, st.Josephs Missouri I29, Lincoln Nebraska,I80, through smal Nebraska towns to Denver Co from the NorthEast.

2, Wonder which route provides the bets photo ops. I could always ride one way in and the other way out.


3. Basic touring tires if my Pirelli St folds? If I have to throw on a cheap set of tires what is good PR3s still expensive? 

4. Any great Yamaha shops or FJR enthusiast locales en route?

5. Altitude issues for my 2005? I remember reading that some FJRs have altitude problems. What's the cure should I get all choked up a mile high in the sky?

6. Any Good motorcycle sites, touring sites, motorcycle landmarks, sweet twisties in the middle ?

Thanks!

#2 rockmurf

rockmurf

    IBA #31100

  • Members++
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 639 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Bradenton, FL
  • Bike: 2013A (Gen III) N. America

Posted 12 March 2012 - 02:40 AM

Make sure your tire pressure is 40 F and 42 R for all that riding. other stuff can't help you with.

#3 garyahouse

garyahouse

    newbs need the forum

  • Members++
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,972 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Spring Hill, Florida
  • Bike: 2005 ABS (Gen I) N. America

Posted 12 March 2012 - 02:48 AM

Driving west: You gain approx. 1 hour of daylight for every 1040 miles. That's 25,000 miles (circumference of the earth) divided by 24 hours (one day). Therefore if you average 60 mph including your stops, that's 17.33 hours to go 1000 miles. At that rate, you'll save 3.46 minutes (of daylight) per hour as you travel west. Unless of course you travel at night. Ya can't save what you don't have. Or unless you travel east, then you reverse everything and lose daylight. Or unless you change time zones... is any of this making sense? Dude it's Monday. Why not just take a plane? At 1040 mph, the sun will never set.

Gary
darksider #44
FJR: the most fun you can legally have.

#4 HotRodZilla

HotRodZilla

    I've Been Warned!!

  • Members++
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,745 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Albuquerque, NM
  • Bike: 2007 ABS (Gen II) N. America

Posted 12 March 2012 - 06:51 AM

Gary is right. You cannot drive/ride fast enough to make up time just by going west. Leave your house at 0500, and ride until about 10pm. It's not that hard if you stop just about every 200 miles for fuel, a short rest and bathroom break. There will be plenty of truck stops that you can be really close to 200 every time.

I would set my tires at 43 rear 42 front for all that freeway riding, then get on the bike and hit it. You won't have any altitude issues, and the bike should run fine, unless you have some underlying issue that you don't know about.

As far as looking for the most scenic route for picture stops, twisty roads, or attractions, remember that each of those cost you time. If you don't have a lot of it, you don't want to make too many detours off your planned path. You can do about 10 over on the interstate without issue. Most places, that's 80-85mph. Twisty roads are much slower and will take you out of your way.

Have fun...

I'd rather go down the river with seven studs than with a hundred shitheads"
- Colonel Charlie Beckwith

 

"Never Kick A Fresh Turd On A Hot Day."

-Harry S Truman


#5 twistedcricket

twistedcricket

    You have whiskey?

  • Members++
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,482 posts
  • Location:Omahell, NE
  • Bike: 2007 ABS (Gen II) N. America

Posted 12 March 2012 - 07:15 AM

You'll have the best March weather to do the ride. We're supposed to be in the 70s here. The western part of NE and into CO might not be as warm. Check the weather.
IBA # 38626

Yep....Major League Hosed, as in "the wife just caught you jerking off to pictures of Regis Philbin" hosed.

-- RadioHowie

#6 HotRodZilla

HotRodZilla

    I've Been Warned!!

  • Members++
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,745 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Albuquerque, NM
  • Bike: 2007 ABS (Gen II) N. America

Posted 12 March 2012 - 07:18 AM

Oh yeah...I forgot. Make sure you have a CamelBak or something so you can hydrate while on the bike. Trying to slam water or something at every gas stop will not give you enough hydration to last almost 3 hours at a time.

I'd rather go down the river with seven studs than with a hundred shitheads"
- Colonel Charlie Beckwith

 

"Never Kick A Fresh Turd On A Hot Day."

-Harry S Truman


#7 TomInCA

TomInCA

    FJR Commander

  • Members++
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,347 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Pittsburgh, PA
  • Bike: 2005 ABS (Gen I) N. America

Posted 12 March 2012 - 07:30 AM

As for routing, the interstates are the the fastest and most boring trip. There is not much to see across either Kansas or Nebraska anyway. I have traveled both US36 and US50, and you can make nearly interstate freeway time on either one, with the edge going to US50 which is nearly 100% divided highway from St. Louis to Colorado. It does avoid a LOT of truck traffic. Which route is best, depends on where you are going. Colorado is a big state, so 36 brings you into Boulder, and US50 enters south of Denver near Colorado Springs and rises to Salida. At this time of year, US50 tends to be warmer and dryer than US36 but watch your weather as snow is possible anywhere along your route this time of year.

A waterproof duffle is better than a top case, and is easy to take in at night. BE FLEXIBLE. You may make the whole trip in one chunk, or weather may slow you down. Independent motor lodges are your friend. Chains suck, and especially avoid Days Inn.

beestrike.jpg

I ride an FJR. I don't need no stinkin' trailer.


#8 ahchiu

ahchiu

    FJR Commander

  • Members++
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,894 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Seattle, WA
  • Bike: 2006 ABS (Gen II) World

Posted 12 March 2012 - 07:59 AM

I can tell you that starting from yesterday you have 1 more hr of daylight.. :lol:
Marcus
06 FJR1300A, 04 R6
Previous Bikes: 00 Honda ST1100, 97 Triumph Tiger, 83 Suzuki GS1100E
I'M SLOWER THAN SOME, FASTER THAN MOST

#9 NMRoadRunner

NMRoadRunner

    A Bulls work is never done!

  • Members++
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 800 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Newer Mexico
  • Bike: 2007 ABS (Gen II) N. America

Posted 12 March 2012 - 08:22 AM

An old indian explained day light saving time to me as "only a white man would think that cutting a foot off the bottom of the blanket, and adding it to the top will make the blanket longer" :rolleyes:
09-11-01 05-01-11 "We Remembered"
IBA #32632,NAFO 08,2009 LOE 1000, SW-FOG 2010, Cancun 2011, MotoGP 2013 COTA
" I drink because she bitches, or she bitches because I drink"

#10 SkooterG

SkooterG

    Purveyor of Crooked Facts

  • Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 11,015 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Skootsdale, AZ
  • Bike: 2004 (Gen I) N. America

Posted 12 March 2012 - 08:28 AM

Tomorrow? Really?
IBA #327........................ Darksider #52

FJR#1 - The 'Dirty Ol Whore' - 2004 non-abs - RIP @ 226,400 - Gone, but not forgotton.
FJR#2 - The 'Hula Girl' - 2004 ABS - 143k
FJR#3 - The 'Virgin' - 2004 ABS - 4344 miles, a garage queen - Brundog would be proud!
FJR#4 - The Oregon FJR - 2004 ABS - 65k
FJR#5 - The Bastard POS Gen II - 2009A - 42k

Posted Image Posted Image Posted Image

#11 Denver_FJR

Denver_FJR

    FJR Pilot

  • Members++
  • PipPipPip
  • 368 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Denver, Co
  • Bike: 2007 ABS (Gen II) N. America

Posted 12 March 2012 - 08:37 AM

I was going to say avoid Kansas due to slower Interstate speed limits, but a quick search of Internet show's they've gotten with the program and have upped speed limit to 75mph.

Dunno about scenery recommendations east of Denver, aka I70, I76, or US36, as it's all flat as far as you can see, heh. All the good stuff is west of Denver, but roads in mountains are probably still heavily sanded.

Edited by Denver_FJR, 12 March 2012 - 08:38 AM.

Pondering the mystery of the woefully inadequate FJR battery


#12 Ignacio

Ignacio

    Administrative Idealist

  • Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 9,555 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Tri-Cities, WA
  • Bike: 2014ES (Gen III) N. America

Posted 12 March 2012 - 08:42 AM

5. Altitude issues for my 2005? I remember reading that some FJRs have altitude problems. What's the cure should I get all choked up a mile high in the sky?

Review this section. You'll see FJRF004 does not apply to most years including yours.

Overall, I'd be looking at the weather the day or two before and pick the option that's the least likely to be affected by weather. Early March riding is unpredictable--especially in altitudes that have evergreens growing.

My LD Blog, IBA #332

2014ES "Deep Thought", 2005 ABS "Heart of Gold", 2005 "Zaphod" & 2013 Husqvarana TR650 Strada "Noxeema"
wfo04.gif through wfo09.gifBMR.jpg150K%2005CLUB.jpg
Seat Review here (click on About Me) or here. Gen 1 LED conversion for instrument lights here and taillights here. Watts of radar detectors and GPS here.
Google Search is your FJRForum friend! Try something like best tire FJR site:fjrforum.com at google.com


#13 wheatonFJR

wheatonFJR

    :D

  • Members++
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 13,360 posts
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Location:Greenville,SC
  • Bike: 2004 ABS (Gen I) N. America

Posted 12 March 2012 - 08:45 AM

First bit of advice is to plan earlier.

It's always good to get advice, but timely advice and good planning is always good if taking a long trip.

That being said, sometimes serendipitous trips to places unknown can be the most satisfying. Even a trip to nowhere works better with a good reliable steed, and good packing.

#14 fjrsochs

fjrsochs

    FJR Pilot

  • Members++
  • PipPipPip
  • 135 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:indiana
  • Bike: 2005 (Gen I) N. America

Posted 12 March 2012 - 09:48 AM

Ive Been planning/thinking the trip for about 6mos. But, I forgot one of the best planning resources, you guys! Probably leavin around 3am. Weather man has been sayings low of 45degrees all week, hi of 70-80---and sunny. Figured I'd drive closer to 180mph for 6hours. That extra hour of daylight is significant!!!! :bye: that'll give me a couple hours to slab around west of Denver.

I think there needs to be an FJR stop every 200 miles, not a truck stop. A moto Farkle stop! :bike: Who's with me ??!! :moil:

All kidding(and typos) aside, thanks guys!

#15 Sharif

Sharif

    FJR Pilot

  • Members++
  • PipPipPip
  • 273 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Granger, IN
  • Bike: 2006 ABS (Gen II) World

Posted 12 March 2012 - 09:51 AM

If you're going for 3 days and can't fit everything in the saddlebags, you probably need to rethink your packing strategy. No need for a topcase for such a short trip unless you're bringing gifts!

My advice? Get everything ready and loaded tonight, big dinner, then go to sleep, as early as you can. Leave in the middle of the night (1-2 am) so you get your dark riding done on roads most familiar to you and your body will want to be awake. Maximize the overlap between trip excitement and darkness.

If you're looking to maximize time with your friend, don't spend time trying to scout interesting routes on the way out - just crank it out on the interstates. You can typically find a decent rabbit and make good time.

The FJR just eats miles. Move around a bit on the bike and you'll be fine.

Edited by Sharif, 12 March 2012 - 09:52 AM.

The ripple has begun...
IBA #44614
Posted ImagePosted Image

#16 fjrsochs

fjrsochs

    FJR Pilot

  • Members++
  • PipPipPip
  • 135 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:indiana
  • Bike: 2005 (Gen I) N. America

Posted 12 March 2012 - 09:54 AM

A waterproof duffle is better than a top case, and is easy to take in at night. BE FLEXIBLE. You may make the whole trip in one chunk, or weather may slow you down. Independent motor lodges are your friend. Chains suck, and especially avoid Days Inn.



Being more musician/office dude less soldier, how the heck do I strap on a duffle ? There's a uTube vid I could use.

#17 Geezer

Geezer

    Parsimonious Curmudgeon

  • Members++
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,537 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Shandaken, NY
  • Bike: 2005 (Gen I) N. America

Posted 12 March 2012 - 09:56 AM

Like Zilla said, you have to hydrate.

I tried a Camelback and it didn't work for me, so I carry bottled water and drink as often as possible. Even in cool weather the wind will dry you out and you will get light headed if you don't drink enough water even if you don't realize you are thirsty.
'Frodo, It's a dangerous business, going out one's front door'

#18 fjrsochs

fjrsochs

    FJR Pilot

  • Members++
  • PipPipPip
  • 135 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:indiana
  • Bike: 2005 (Gen I) N. America

Posted 12 March 2012 - 09:57 AM

If you're going for 3 days and can't fit everything in the saddlebags, you probably need to rethink your packing strategy. No need for a topcase for such a short trip unless you're bringing gifts!

My advice? Get everything ready and loaded tonight, big dinner, then go to sleep, as early as you can. Leave in the middle of the night (1-2 am) so you get your dark riding done on roads most familiar to you and your body will want to be awake. Maximize the overlap between trip excitement and darkness.

If you're looking to maximize time with your friend, don't spend time trying to scout interesting routes on the way out - just crank it out on the interstates. You can typically find a decent rabbit and make good time.

The FJR just eats miles. Move around a bit on the bike and you'll be fine.


Good stuff here! Thanks.
Oil gets changed at 2:30. Good mechanic checking the bike over. I'll pack (my moto cover and toothbrush), find the camelback for my jacket, take a nap, and then blast off.

Edited by fjrsochs, 12 March 2012 - 09:59 AM.


#19 fjrsochs

fjrsochs

    FJR Pilot

  • Members++
  • PipPipPip
  • 135 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:indiana
  • Bike: 2005 (Gen I) N. America

Posted 12 March 2012 - 10:02 AM

After this trip,I'm gonna need one of those maps for my sig. Where can I get that?

#20 SacramentoMike

SacramentoMike

    Not Safe For Work

  • Members++
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,880 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Sacramento, CA (honest)
  • Bike: 2005 ABS (Gen I) N. America

Posted 12 March 2012 - 10:15 AM

I get road-hypnotized on a long ride sometimes, and I've never put up the numbers you're talking about. Too much coffee just is too much coffee, and anyway it makes you have to stop and pee too often. One solution--I like those little energy drinks. I wouldn't drink them like water, in fact they say not to drink more than one a day, but when I'm getting all yawn-y and my mind starts wandering, I like to pull one out of my tank bag and drink it on the fly. (I've developed a technique for grabbing the cap in my teeth and twisting the bottle till the plastic seal breaks and drinking it while I ride. Only works with a modular helmet, though. Or a beanie, I suppose.) Nice refreshing tart/berry flavor, too.

Altitude won't be an issue for the bike. And Garyahouse's figures are perfect. If you live on the equator. :rolleyes:
"These are my principles. If you don't like them, I have others." Groucho Marx
"Consider the daffodil. And while you're doing that, I'll be over here, looking through your stuff." Jack Handy
"Watch out for that tree!" George of the Jungle
Posted Image Posted Image Posted Image Posted ImagePosted Image Posted Image