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Emergency on-bike tire kit


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#1 slapnpop

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Posted 25 November 2005 - 04:00 PM

Looking for that special gift for that special FJR riding buddy of yours?

How about an all the time on the bike tire repair kit! All of the parts were found at my local autozone, advanced, or the like.

Here's your shopping list
#1. Slime Brand COMP-04 mini-compressor - $20.00
#2. Slime brand 35peice Tire Tacklebox - $5.00
#3. Air pressure gauge with hose and locking reading - $13.00
#4. Mini-pack of spare fuses - $0.99
#5. I picked up a trailer light plug that matched my battery tender cable, but you could just as easily pick up 2, some wire, and an inline fuse, to replicate the battery harness on the battery tender.

I picked thise pump because it's VERY small, and has an on-off switch. This way you aren't rushing to plug-unplug it when dealing with filling tires. Since I had the battery tender quick-plug installed, I used this as a power source for the pump. Normally my battery tender plug is located under the right side lower fairing. Easily accessable without removing the fairing and completely out of sight. The battery tender has a small fuse from the factory, and must be replaced with a larger capacity fuse to run the pump. The wiring is of sufficient gauge.



I found a matching plug at the auto parts store normally used for trailer lights. I cut off the cigarette lighter plug on the pump, and soldered on the trailer plug light using several layers of shrink wrap to insulate the splices, and several more larger layers to re-inforce the overall joint.



As for the the Tire Tacklebox:


I took out the tube patches and cheep pen-type pressure guage, and added the stock toolkit's combo screwdriver and a mini-crescent wrench, that pack of spare fuses, a bit of wire and some spade terminals and wire ties. A dremel was used to clear some room for the wrench.

Included in the kit were a tar worm type set of patches and tools, spare schradder valves and tool, and some valve caps of various types.

*Edit 8/10/09* After actually having to use the pictured tire plug tools below, I no longer recommend them. The screwdriver style is difficult to use, and actually broke when I got it a little off angle, nearly taking a section of my hand out. They have since been replaced with the typical T-handle style, and are not longer stored in the tackle-box, just floating under the seat.



]
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#2 slapnpop

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Posted 25 November 2005 - 04:00 PM

The pressure guage is very convient for the motorcycle. It's got a 8" hose and 90degree fitting that fit the front wheel very well. The gauge also locks the reading at the highest pressure, so you don't have to read the gauge while it's on the valve. In fact, I was able un unscrew the cap, get a measurement of the pressure, read the gauge, and screw the cap back on, all with one hand while I took pictures with the other.






Now comes the fun part...

Having played too much tetris as a child, I just KNEW all of this would fit under the stock seat. Sure enough, it does.





Of course, you'll have to ditch the stock toolcase, or re-locate it.

I carry a larger toolcase when going out-of-town, so this isn't a concern.



This case contains various sockets, extensions, and a rachet, a set of allen bits, a set of security torx bits, a larger crescent wrench and several flat wrenches, a #3 phillips screwdriver, small pliers with cutter, standard pliers, wire strippers, small multimeter, electrical tape, scissors, spare contacts, and a couple bits of rope. This is usually stashed in a saddle bag.




At any rate, this setup is not only usefull for your bike, but riding buddies and car trouble as well. The pump includes a good length of cable, and can be used without having to park uncomfortably close.

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#3 radman

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Posted 25 November 2005 - 04:35 PM

Nice set up slappy. Nice man-purse too tongue.gif
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#4 JimV

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Posted 25 November 2005 - 06:52 PM

That's a nice kit you've put together.

I was just thinking about tire pumps last night. I'm curious if you or anyone else has seen this little footpump. I like the small size, built-in pressure guage and the zero loss fitting for the valve stem. It probably won't fit under the seat though.


Air Revolution Footpump

Cheers,

Jim

#5 BrunDog

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Posted 26 November 2005 - 06:33 AM

OK, I'll bite...

Why do all that when CO2 cartridges can pump up a tire in a jam?

Actually, I know the answer, but I don't have the room for the compressor, considering my Audiovox CC and my Scorpio alarm occupy the tool tray. Under the passenger seat I have a stop-n-go kit with CO2 tanks.

Nice set-up. I guess I need to ride with someone like you who has one.

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#6 slapnpop

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Posted 26 November 2005 - 06:44 AM

With the pump I never have to pay for air at a gas station, and I don't have to keep buying CO2 cartridges to re-fill the tires. Also, if there's an electrical problem that keeps the pump from working, chances are I'm not going anywhere regardless of the tire.

My CC is under the side panel.
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#7 skyway

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Posted 26 November 2005 - 07:40 AM

QUOTE
With the pump I never have to pay for air at a gas station


I carry a sparrow 12v pump and fixings for a flat with me, but I never pay for air at a gas station. Just go inside and ask them to turn it on or give you a token. In CA I believe it is required by law.

Nice tool kit BTW, it just remindes me that I still need to spend some time and assemble the essentials.

#8 skyway

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Posted 26 November 2005 - 08:08 AM

I followed the link for the air gage, but I think it is linking to a different unit. This one was right below:

G.H. Meiser Accu-gage Professional Series 60 Psi W/ Hose, Right Angle Chuck And Rgg - Bulk Package

#9 HondaCBX6

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Posted 26 November 2005 - 09:50 AM

A good tire repair kit is a must for anyone who is traveling any distance. I mean ANY distance. Having a plug kit, tool and a compressor of some type will save the day. If not for you for someone else. I repaired 3 tires last year. None of them mine. When I say repaired I mean plugging a hole so the person could ride/drive away. One was a cage.....

I have one of those Monkey plug kits and a cut down Campell Hausfeld compressor. Some of that blue flexible industrial airline. Enough to run it about 10 feet. This along with the 15 feet of power cable that came with the compressor I can reach a long way. I replaced the original hose to adapt one of those clamping chucks to the end. That way I do not have to hold it to the tire. I also got fancy with the pressure gage. Using a Keyance digital pressure controller to preset the pressure desired. http://world.keyence..._c30w_spec.html
With it's 2 setpoints I can initiate the fill by pressing the button. This latches the compressor and it will fil to the predetermined level. The controller is accurate to +/-0.1#. A little anal I know.....but I work with these kind of things and think it is pretty slick if I must say so myself... wink.gif I had this at WFO3 and filled several peoples tires to their likeing without moving my bike.

I have also used the 15ft length of power cord from the compressor to charge a fellow FJR riders battery enough from my bike to allow us to push start it. He pulled a newbie FJR owner mistake by putting his kickstand down and forgetting to turn off the key. When we got back his bike was dead. I improvised and jumped his bike from mine. We tried to jump it but (dumby me) there was a fuse (DUH) in the circuit. That one needs repalcing.... We charged it for 5 minutes or so and then push started it. The FJR fired right up.

I also stopped and helped two other rider this summer. Both had fuel "issues". One guy was riding a new Star. He ran out of gas and didn't see the fuel light flashing! The other was a very cute female rider. New to the bike/sport. Her newbie mistake was not understanding what reserve was. She ran out of gas and them proceeded to run her battery down. I pointed out the little valve to put it on reserve and then push started it for her. It was a small 400 so it was easy to do on the side of the roade. She was impressed! I reminded her to turn the valve ack to "ON" after she got gas. I wonder how she is doing anyway? 5'2", 110#. redhead! wink.gif OUCH! well worth the stop to help! smile.gif

There was also one other incident where I did NOT stop to help. I saw some guy on a rat Harley loose a tail pipe! I could have stopped to pick it up and save him the walk back but I figured the walk would do that guy some good! biggrin.gif I ended up passing him again along the way and was laughing to myself hearing that thing running without a pipe! It being straped to the sissybar.... laugh.gif

John

#10 slapnpop

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Posted 26 November 2005 - 10:43 AM

QUOTE(skyway @ Nov 26 2005, 10:40 AM)
QUOTE
With the pump I never have to pay for air at a gas station


I carry a sparrow 12v pump and fixings for a flat with me, but I never pay for air at a gas station. Just go inside and ask them to turn it on or give you a token. In CA I believe it is required by law.

Nice tool kit BTW, it just remindes me that I still need to spend some time and assemble the essentials.

Here in TN, they do not have to give you free air. It can be free at one station and as much as $0.75 at the next. Checking the tires a few times a week started to be an exspinsive proposition, so I got an air compressor for the house. I still found myself buying air from time to time when I was out, so I opted for this route.

I've also had gas station gauges be VERY VERY wrong on their readings, so I don't trust a gauge I don't now. I had one tire on a car filled to over 50 lbs for a few days after trusting a gas station gauge. It felt odd so I re-checked it later with my own gauge and saw how wrong it was. I went back and verified the gas station's gauge was indeading reading about 30% low.
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#11 twowheelnut

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Posted 26 November 2005 - 06:49 PM

"You just pucker your lips and blow!"
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#12 edocar

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Posted 27 November 2005 - 05:36 PM

I purchased a mini foot pump from JC Whitney earlier this past summer. It is used to inflate my bicycle tires (it has attachments for presta and schraeder valves) , two wheeler, car and motorcycle tires. It is compact and easy to use: to a point. I had to inflate my car's front tires this morning from 20 to 26lbs and it took 175 strokes/tire. To some readers that may seem unrealistic but the bottom line is it works and I am glad I purchased it.

#13 red2kcbr

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Posted 28 November 2005 - 09:29 AM

With a little control, edocar, you can double that stroke count. Oh, wait, wrong forum. My bad. wub.gif

#14 Rickster

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Posted 03 May 2006 - 02:10 PM

I've been carrying a home made tire kit for years now.

Ultraflate (from a bike shop, about $15) -- uses standard CO2 cartridges available most anywhere
Needle, Reemer, and regular auto radial plugs (walmart).

One note -- replace your rubber cement every year, it's only a couple bucks, and get new plugs (the gooey cord type) over time, both of these dry out, and you don't want to find that out when it's time to use it.

Why? My thoughts? you ask? sure....

CO2 is easy to find (I carry 5 little botles), and I don't have to worry about the electric motor dying, no wiring harnesses (I have several bikes, so I just grab my zip-lock and stick it on the other bike)

Why ultraflate -- it's cheap, and has a trigger so you don't have to expend ALL the C02 (you may need some to find the leak, then 2 to fill up.)

Works fine, lasts a long time (I always KNOW the C02 will work, and don't have to worry about the compressor motor working)

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#15 Fencer

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Posted 19 June 2006 - 05:42 PM

Just did the Slappy set up (modified of course) and it workd great!

Thanks for the idea.

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#16 odot

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Posted 15 August 2006 - 07:11 AM

Bought the progressive suspension plug kit with CO2 bottles. Cool thing about them cartridges is that we use them on life vests here at work. Of course they are time limited(the life vests) so we have to replace them from time to time. None-the-less....I have an unlimited supply of cartridges.
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#17 dean

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Posted 14 March 2007 - 03:25 AM

after reading the original post and seeing the pics, i decided it was time as well. i've only had the fjr 10 days, but i've had two other bikes that i've ridden up to 7 hours to get to rallies, without any form of tire repair. i picked up the stuff at wal-mart including a smaller electric tire pump, removed the case and just have the innards, all packed under the seat. my last step is to get an adapter from aerostich, female cigarette plug on one end, sae on the other.

i do have an electrical question: i have an sae cord wired to the battery, and i use it for my aerostich vest or jacket, it winds under the right inner "cockpit" fairing, and sticks up just near my right knee. then i just plug my vest or jacket in. i believe aerostich mentions the clothing has a fuse wired in; the connection from the battery does not; do i need to wire in a fuse if i were to plug in the pump, which would then be connected directly to the battery?

or what about the accessory connection inside the "glove box"? that's rated at 3A; the air pump is rated at 12A, so what if i put in a 15A fuse?

thx,

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#18 Geezer

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Posted 14 March 2007 - 03:38 AM

QUOTE(dean @ Mar 14 2007, 07:25 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
(snip)
or what about the accessory connection inside the "glove box"? that's rated at 3A; the air pump is rated at 12A, so what if i put in a 15A fuse?

thx,

You'll overheat the wires for the circuit or, at a minimum, burn out the pump due to voltage drop. Better to wire directly to the battery with 14 gauge wire and 15 amp fuse.

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#19 slapnpop

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Posted 14 March 2007 - 02:25 PM

QUOTE(Geezer @ Mar 14 2007, 06:38 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
You'll overheat the wires for the circuit or, at a minimum, burn out the pump due to voltage drop. Better to wire directly to the battery with 14 gauge wire and 15 amp fuse.


The wiring would burn up before the DC motor stopped turning from a voltage drop. It might slow down a little, thought... blink.gif

QUOTE
i believe aerostich mentions the clothing has a fuse wired in; the connection from the battery does not; do i need to wire in a fuse if i were to plug in the pump, which would then be connected directly to the battery?


It would be best to install a fuse in the power chain, as close as possible in the wiring to the positive battery terminal. Any length of wiring between the positive batt. terminal and the fuse is suseptable to a gloriously extravagant failure. (when it happens, do NOT look directly into the sparks)
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#20 Fencer

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Posted 14 March 2007 - 06:14 PM

This is the Walmart one I did


Is yours the same? campel-hausfeld? No the cig in the dash will not work

I did one from a battery tender connector and ran it through the fairing to a hookup on the side. Just watch for polarity changes


Then you can run a cig lighter or an easy jump start connector


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