2006 Canadian wiring diagram

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torch

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I didn't realize there were differences between the Canadian and US versions in 2006 and the FSM I picked up was from the US. Does anyone have a Canadian version wiring diagram?
 

mcatrophy

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I doubt there's much difference.

Probably even less difference compared to the UK variant. Below is a circuit of the UK 2006/7, curtesy of Haynes. Although the bike has the same security gubbins as I think your Canadian one has, it's not shown on the circuit, probably to give the ungodly less information that might help them disable it.

I find the Haynes diagram much easier to follow, it has component names on the diagram instead of reference numbers, and it's easier to follow paths through connectors.

(Click on image for larger view, click on that for the original)



(Apologies for quality, best I could do in 3 minutes.)
 

torch

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mcatrophy

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Thanks for the effort, however the link is not working at this end. "The webpage at [quote]https://atrophy.lock.net/pi/extras/index.php?image=2006_FJR_circuit.jpg&size=1[/quote] might be temporarily down or it may have moved permanently to a new web address."

I don't know what differences there are. Two I have heard mention are the security system and supposedly the Canadian model is pre-wired for heated grips.
Web site was down due to a power cut to my house, out of my control. Sorry about that. Should be ok now.

As I mentioned in my earlier post, the security system isn't shown. The heated grips are.
 

torch

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Hmmm. Still having trouble. It might be the network at my end -- I'm at work and the firewall can be a bit silly at times. I'll try again tomorrow when I get home.

Thanks!
 

torch

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The original link works fine from home. Thanks!

Re: copyright: small excerpt of the total work, used for educational purposes and private study = legal fair use.

It is important to respect the copyright of authors, don't get me wrong. But the rights go both ways and there are far too many players willing to intimidate users from exercising their legitimate rights too.

I just needed to study the difference in one small part of the circuit (heated grips). And now that I know the Haynes manual is more representative of my variation in some ways than the Yamaha manual I purchased, I may even go out and buy a Haynes, especially if I can find one tailored to the Canadian FJR.
 

mcatrophy

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The original link works fine from home. Thanks!

Re: copyright: small excerpt of the total work, used for educational purposes and private study = legal fair use.

It is important to respect the copyright of authors, don't get me wrong. But the rights go both ways and there are far too many players willing to intimidate users from exercising their legitimate rights too.

I just needed to study the difference in one small part of the circuit (heated grips). And now that I know the Haynes manual is more representative of my variation in some ways than the Yamaha manual I purchased, I may even go out and buy a Haynes, especially if I can find one tailored to the Canadian FJR.
I don't think the Haynes manual comes in any guise other than UK, and only up to 2013 (not that that concerns your 2006). Having said that, in many ways it is better than the Yamaha manual, it's far more practical, tells you how to do stuff by someone who's done it on a bike taken off the street, as opposed to the Yamaha that is aimed at fully trained professionals and more how the bike was built in the factory.

Illustrations can be a bit poor quality, but, again, they are real photos of the job being done, it's also lacking details of error codes. I've used both manuals together, I find them complementary.

It apparently now comes with on-line access to extra stuff including videos, I've no experience of this. Info here.

Just my 2 pennyworth.
 
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torch

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In 2003 they were identical except Canadian models were in KMs only, the US ones could switch back and forth.

By 2006, it appears Canadian models added the european immobilizer system and wiring for Yamaha accessory heated grips and alarm system. Reading old posts suggests Canadians got the grips themselves standard in 2007. What the differences for later years, I cannot say with any certainty.
 

torch

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BTW: in the unlikely event that someone else ever wants to add heated grips to a Canadian 06, the pre-installed wiring is pretty limited. The wires to the heaters terminate in a pair of loose connectors inside the left fairing under the C panel, not in the switch housings. They are wired in series anyway, which limits power to 6v each -- not really going to get sufficient heat out of them.

I found one of the supposed two connectors to the controller nearby, under the glovebox -- the one with the green wire from the headlight fuse. but not the second connector with the ground. Doesn't matter -- the ground spiders don't really need any additional loads so I ran a separate ground to the battery for the stuff I'm adding.

I'm not a big fan of drawing an extra 3 amps from the headlamp circuit, so I ended up using that green wire just to actuate a relay and ran my own 12v feed from the battery too. I needed power for heated clothing anyway. It's not a perfect fit, doesn't latch, but a GM sensor connector fits into the Yamaha HG connector, providing the tap to power up the relay with the headlight. A zip tie will suffice as a latch.

The square blank plate (which I believe is replaced by the Yamaha HG controller) makes a nice mounting place for two 5 amp PWM 12v motor controllers, which work perfectly for heated grips too. I'll throw up some pics later if there is interest.

Anyway, thanks for the help!
 

graytaz

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Dwayne,
You're correct that the Yamaha grip heaters are in series. I installed a pair on my 2003 and I found they worked just fine for my use although my winter use was pretty minimal. I certainly had no issue with them connected to the running light circuit.
Can those heater elements handle 12Volts? The controller likely isn't designed to handle the additional current long term.
heated grips schematic.jpg
 

torch

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Greytaz! Long time no see.

The grip heaters I use are quite happy (and warm) at 12v. Warmth is actually a function of wattage, so it is possible that the Yamaha ones are designed to draw twice the current at half the voltage to produce the same wattage. The ones I am using draw about 3 amps total at 12v each (nomimal). So maybe the Yamaha ones are designed to draw 6 amps total at 6 volts each.

But I doubt it. That would require a more expensive controller. Seems to me I remember Yamaha was rebadging Hot Grips or similar products in 2003. So was Honda and the Honda branded kit was cheaper but otherwise identical. I don't know if that is still the case.

The PWM motor controllers I used are rated 5 amps. Mind you, those are Chinese amps, which seem to be about half a regular amp. But then, the grips are a purely resistive load and motor controllers are supposed to be rated for an inductive load, so hopefully it'll all balance out in the end. Besides, I'm only going to be using them when it's cold out -- that should help keep the mosfets happy! <lol>
 

mcatrophy

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Warmth is actually a function of wattage, so it is possible that the Yamaha ones are designed to draw twice the current at half the voltage to produce the same wattage. The ones I am using draw about 3 amps total at 12v each (nomimal). So maybe the Yamaha ones are designed to draw 6 amps total at 6 volts each.

But I doubt it. That would require a more expensive controller.
I think you misunderstand this a little. If your grips are in parallel and draw a total of 3 amps, then the total power is 3 x 12 = 36 watts, each grip has half the total current, so 1.5 amps, at 12 volts, 18 watts. To get the same power in series grips, that's still 36 watts, so still 3 amps at 12 volts, each grip now has 3 amps at 6 volts, 18 watts each. Still a total of 3 amps from the controller.

Incidentally, usually they design these things so that the grip on the throttle side has a little less power than on the clutch side, heat transfers away to the bars more easily on the fixed bar than through the throttle tube.
 

torch

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I think you misunderstand this a little. If your grips are in parallel and draw a total of 3 amps, then the total power is 3 x 12 = 36 watts, each grip has half the total current, so 1.5 amps, at 12 volts, 18 watts. To get the same power in series grips, that's still 36 watts, so still 3 amps at 12 volts, each grip now has 3 amps at 6 volts, 18 watts each. Still a total of 3 amps from the controller.

Yes, you are correct. I mispoke. That said, to draw 18 watts per grip, the heaters must be 8 ohms each. What I should have said is that if the Yamaha grips are also 8 ohms, they will deliver half the power per grip as they are wired in series.

Of course, if the Yamaha ones are 4 ohms each, then the output would be equivalent.

Some grips are indeed designed to output more heat on the left grip. Mine are not. So I apply a layer of gorilla tape first to insulate the heater from the bar. It helps keep them balanced. Not perfect, perhaps, but not too bad.
 

mcatrophy

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That said, to draw 18 watts per grip, the heaters must be 8 ohms each. What I should have said is that if the Yamaha grips are also 8 ohms, they will deliver half the power per grip as they are wired in series.

Of course, if the Yamaha ones are 4 ohms each, then the output would be equivalent.
Your 8 ohms is right for the parallel grips, but it's 2 ohms each, not 4, for the series.

A few years ago, I made my own grip heating elements for my Trophy. My little write-up might help with envisaging this, but note my assumptions on voltage and power required were different from our discussion here, it's the principles that are of interest.
 
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torch

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Your 8 ohms is right for the parallel grips, but it's 2 ohms each, not 4, for the series.
You are correct again. I don't know what's wrong with me this week -- I should be able to do this stuff in my head, now I better start with a pencil before I start typing. That'll teach me to dash off a quick reply before bed.

Anyway, my point is still valid even if my numbers are not. Yamaha's grips may deliver just as much heat if they are designed with lower resistance -- eg two parallel windings per grip similar to what you describe in your home-wound heaters project.

PS: I have done similar things with nichrome, making smoke units for toy trains. ;-)
 
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