Clutch Problem

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Rex

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I have been searching the forums for this, but have not been able to find an answer.
I have a '07 FJR. Ever since I've had it (bought it used) the clutch engagement is not right and I'm not sure how to fix it.
As soon as the lever comes off the grip, the bike starts moving immediately. It's hard to get used to. Does it just need bleeding?
Thanks in advance for any help.
 

RossKean

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May need bleeding or might need to be dismantled and steels scrubbed and fiber disks soaked in oil. Search for clutch soak. I would start with bleeding. Easier and should be done every couple years anyway.
 

RossKean

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Look at the following link for a most excellent description of the clutch soak. Link to 56 photos!

 

escapefjrtist

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GEN II's have a fairly narrow clutch engagement, typically close off the handlebar. Other items to check is the pivot bushing and brass push rod bushing in the lever. When the bushing(s) is badly worn, the master cylinder push rod will move less and disengage the clutch less. Makes for even less lever travel before clutch engagement.

~G
 

RossKean

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GEN II's have a fairly narrow clutch engagement, typically close off the handlebar. Other items to check is the pivot bushing and brass push rod bushing in the lever. When the bushing(s) is badly worn, the master cylinder push rod will move less and disengage the clutch less. Makes for even less lever travel before clutch engagement.

~G
Good point! I am pretty careful to clean and lube the pivot and that brass bushing at least annually using a good waterproof grease but I have seen the bushing worn clear through on bikes that weren't maintained as well. Could definitely affect clutch engagement. Fairly cheap part and easy to replace. Parts fiche calls it "bush" IIRC.
 

infrared

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I have been searching the forums for this, but have not been able to find an answer.
I have a '07 FJR. Ever since I've had it (bought it used) the clutch engagement is not right and I'm not sure how to fix it.
As soon as the lever comes off the grip, the bike starts moving immediately. It's hard to get used to. Does it just need bleeding?
Thanks in advance for any help.
Rex,
There is a brass bushing in the clutch lever (NOT the lever pivot) that pushes the clutch rod into the master cylinder. That bushing can get worn. See pix. Available separately for about US$ 5~$ 10.
Index 4 on the fiche:
bushing, clutch lever

Bleeding the clutch hydraulics (replacing all of the dirty old clutch fluid, not just bleeding out the bubbles) may also be needed.
If all of that is good, then go on to the serious services.

Brass Bushing2.jpg
 
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pierreroyoldtimer

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I have been searching the forums for this, but have not been able to find an answer.
I have a '07 FJR. Ever since I've had it (bought it used) the clutch engagement is not right and I'm not sure how to fix it.
As soon as the lever comes off the grip, the bike starts moving immediately. It's hard to get used to. Does it just need bleeding?
Thanks in advance for any help.
I can’t understand how a clutch handle bushing can be worn out badly enough to cause such a problem. I sold my 2005 last spring with 185,000 km (113,776 miles) and never replaced any parts on the clutch mechanism nor clutch plates. I replaced the fluid twice during that period. But I did clean and lubricate all levers pivots on a regular basis thoug, at every engine oil/filter change. I do the same with my 2012.
 

RossKean

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I can’t understand how a clutch handle bushing can be worn out badly enough to cause such a problem. I sold my 2005 last spring with 185,000 km (113,776 miles) and never replaced any parts on the clutch mechanism nor clutch plates. I replaced the fluid twice during that period. But I did clean and lubricate all levers pivots on a regular basis thoug, at every engine oil/filter change. I do the same with my 2012.
I sold my '07 with 295,000 km (185,000 mi) and I can say the same - original clutch disks and never replaced the brass bushing in the lever but I have seen ones nearly as bad as the one in the photo posted by infrared. Not uncommon if not properly maintained but will last forever if cleaned and lubricated on a semi-regular basis. Clutch (and brake) fluid gets flushed every two years.

Note to OP: Completely flush the clutch circuit if it has not been done in the last couple of years. It is almost as easy to do as a simple bleed to get rid of any possible bubbles in the system and fresh fluid is a good idea anyway. Lots of people like to use "Speed Bleeders" but I never found them to be necessary on the FJR. YMMV
 

FJR-Pilot

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Had exact same issue on my 07. Replaced the handle and the soft brass bushing and it totally fixed it.
 

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  • FJR1300 clutch handle worn out photo.jpg
    FJR1300 clutch handle worn out photo.jpg
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Rex

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Thanks so much for all of the help and responses. This is really a great forum. Sorry for my late response, I have covid right now and have only been checking the forums when I am feeling like it. I think I am over the hump and hopefully will get to try out these recommendations in a couple of days.

The bike has around 29k miles, which isn't a lot, but if that bushing has been dry for awhile, I could see it being worn.

I did adjust the lever to it's maximum setting and it is still not right.

Any time I let someone ride it, it's the first thing they notice and if I don't point it out, they will almost stall the bike.
 

Sunnyorlando

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Rex,
There is a brass bushing in the clutch lever (NOT the lever pivot) that pushes the clutch rod into the master cylinder. That bushing can get worn. See pix. Available separately for about US$ 5~$ 10.
Index 4 on the fiche:
bushing, clutch lever

Bleeding the clutch hydraulics (replacing all of the dirty old clutch fluid, not just bleeding out the bubbles) may also be needed.
If all of that is good, then go on to the serious services.

View attachment 1020
Yes, good place to look at and start. Also the fluids as mentioned.
As I have dealt with many used and project bikes over the years, it amazes me how little attention is placed on simple and inexpensive maintenance such as this. Might also want to look at the front brake lever which has a similar assembly, and the rear brake lever. They all require similar maintenance.
 

dcarver

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A 'bush' fix is to remove the slave cylinder and put a small wad of tin foil or other suitable material in the hole to make the push rod 'longer' for more throw. JSNS.
 

Diablo1

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I don’t think adding a piece of tinfoil at the slave pushrod will do anything to increase throw. It’s a hydraulic system and the throw is determined by the piston ratios and clutch lever mechanical design.
 

infrared

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Sounds more like a fix to get you home rather than a long-term solution. Don't think I would do it other than as an emergency measure.
RossKean,
I agree. That aside, I would suggest putting a tiny washer into the recess inside the brass clutch lever bushing, because a washer will last a while, and it is an easy roadside fix. Same basic idea, sure, but an easier, better way.
 
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