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Archer

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unpunished... Two day ago, on dry roads, I musta stopped my bike and help that litle old lady cross 1st Ave, cuz how else to explain picking up sheet-rock screw in the middle of my Autumn riding! I know what I'm doing tomorrow instead of my NFC NFL.

She's 3 miles of bad road.jpg

Thanks for looking, pile on with the silly-string fix-it comments!
 

RiderJoe

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Yeah, no big deal. This happened to me a few weeks ago too, even though I didn't stop to help anyone. All it takes is a construction truck or someone carrying building waste a few cars ahead of you. Good tires are like magnets for that shape and material items, especially when they are new. (For some reason old tires seem to be more immune to punctures 🤪)
 

Sunnyorlando

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There are certain places on a tire where I would not leave a plug any long-term. And that close to the side is definitely one of them - but that's just me. 😁
I've used plenty of plugs like everyone else here has over the years, but close to the sidewall, it's only to get home.
 

RossKean

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Looks kinda close to the sidewall to me, and I’m a sticky string kinda guy.

Brodie
🤔
Perhaps I am too trusting but I wouldn't consider that too close to the sidewall. Personally, I would plug and ride. As always, I would check tire pressure very regularly for a few days after plugging.
 
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FJRJayke

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Happened to me this season on a brand new tire with 150 miles on it. I'd replace it. I replaced mine.
 

torch

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Mushroom plug from the inside. It's been a few years, but when I researched the topic that was the only repair acceptable to the major tire manufacturers -- with the caveat that any repair derates the tire speed rating.

(A mushroom plug is a combination rubber plug that goes through the hole and an integral patch on the inside of the tire. They really work well)
 

RossKean

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Mushroom plug from the inside. It's been a few years, but when I researched the topic that was the only repair acceptable to the major tire manufacturers -- with the caveat that any repair derates the tire speed rating.

(A mushroom plug is a combination rubber plug that goes through the hole and an integral patch on the inside of the tire. They really work well)
Agreed!
I have no doubt that this (patch-plug) is the most secure tire repair. Even if it leaks, it won't blow out like a sticky string might and if I had access to a tire machine, that is what I would use, despite the fact that it is far more time-consuming. (Many MC places won't patch a tire under any circumstances.) I used patch plugs a couple of times a few years ago when my friend (RIP) owned a complete commercial tire machine and balancer.

That said, I have never had a sticky string plug fail (yet). A drywall screw straight in is probably the best scenario for a string repair. Small hole, rough sides, unlikely to have caused damage to belts (although you should always look for evidence of tire deformation, no matter what sort of repair).

For anyone who hasn't done a sticky string repair, don't assume you will get it right the first time! Good idea to practice on an old tire to get a feeling for insertion, amount of glue and the "twist" upon removal of the tool to create a knot on the inside that won't easily blow out.
 
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unpunished... Two day ago, on dry roads, I musta stopped my bike and help that litle old lady cross 1st Ave, cuz how else to explain picking up sheet-rock screw in the middle of my Autumn riding! I know what I'm doing tomorrow instead of my NFC NFL.

View attachment 3077

Thanks for looking, pile on with the silly-string fix-it comments!
Aah crap, been there. How about this one, must have ridden at least 20 miles like this before I noticed it. No silly string for this one lol!
 

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Super13

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I rode at least 80 spirited miles Chula Vista-Julian-Ocotillo-Chula Vista with this nail in my rear tire. Noticed it parking my bike when I got back home. Practically no one would find you if you crashed in the Anza-Borego desert. Bless Michelin! Fantastic ride, though.
 

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Old Guy

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Perhaps I am too trusting but I wouldn't consider that too close to the sidewall. Personally, I would plug and ride. As always, I would check tire pressure very regularly for a few days after plugging.

It doesn't look that close to the sidewall to me either. I'd plug it and give it a try.
 

Sunnyorlando

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Mushroom plug from the inside. It's been a few years, but when I researched the topic that was the only repair acceptable to the major tire manufacturers -- with the caveat that any repair derates the tire speed rating.

(A mushroom plug is a combination rubber plug that goes through the hole and an integral patch on the inside of the tire. They really work well)
I agree on the mushroom plug, but you can't do that on the road.
 
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