Tire sealant? Roadside flat fix

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StratTuner

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Two flats in two months... $275 to have it towed each time...

Does anyone use sealant in tires? Does it work?

Repair kits? Ropes or plugs?

I have a slime brand pump that connects easily.
What do you use for roadside flats?
 
Just did a search and found many answers.

Should have done that first!

12v pump and sticky string plugs seem to be best.
Wow! You NAILED IT! Good for you. You win FJRForum.com this week.

1707199953773.png

I've had three flats over the years, zero tows because I carried string, blue, and a way to inflate. Only one of them required replacement when I was able to limp to a shop the next morning.

However, I personally avoid the goo and think it's a sticky mess that potentially corrodes things. And of three flats I've had...it wouldn't have stopped the leaks in any meaningful way.
 
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I've repaired several flats while out on the road over the years and was always successful with sticky string and a portable air compressor.
Except for this one time:
1707231793316.png

Sticky string repair would not complete seal this hole, I think because the damage was cross ways through the tire plies, not straight in. The string repair would hold air for about a half day (200 ish) miles losing maybe 10 psi. So this tire got replaced.

But generally I believe the sticky string to be a reliable performer.
 
I've repaired several flats while out on the road over the years and was always successful with sticky string and a portable air compressor.
Except for this one time:
View attachment 6411

Sticky string repair would not complete seal this hole, I think because the damage was cross ways through the tire plies, not straight in. The string repair would hold air for about a half day (200 ish) miles losing maybe 10 psi. So this tire got replaced.

But generally I believe the sticky string to be a reliable performer.
the sticky string should be at the inside, no? :)
 
Personally, I use mushroom plugs and a decased 12V pump from harbor freight. The reason I respond is that if you are a member of the American Motorcyclist Association, you can get free tows. Costs $49 a year. In 18 years as an AMA member, I have had to be towed 3 times. So, $275x3=825. 825/18=$45.83. So I overpay by $3.70. Not bad.

AAA towing won't cover a motorcycle unless you have the highest membership (I think its called RV Plus). Don't ask how I know!

Chad
 
Thank you for posting this thread. I’ve been wondering what I should carry on the bike for tire puncture issues.
Also, note to self and whoever else it concerns:
Wrap a ratchet strap around the rim and tire when tying down rather than hooking a bungee strap to the tread. 😜
 
I asked my mechanic, and as predicted, he advised against. I like the idea that "Ride On" and the like automatically balance the tire, but I'd rather not subject my mechanics to that much GOO!

thanks for all the replies and advice. You can't buy that kind of real experience!
 
Many many moons ago, Rider Magazine had a very in depth article on Ride On, pretty much showing it to be the best thing since sliced bread. Last time I checked, Ride On still had a copy available on their web site.
I used it for several years, even when the only option for obtaining it was at the local Harley dealer, where they made the experience as un-friendly as they possibly could. After a number of tires worn out without trouble, I picked up a screw in the center of my front tire mid-way on a 425 mile ride. No problem, just keep riding and check it later. Screw is small and in the center of the tread, exactly where Ride On says it should work.
Long story still long, Ride On did not work on that occasion, and when I pondered the question of why to Ride On, the entire response was a web of weasel words, primarily to the effect of "we never said it would seal leaks". They were less than amused when I shared the weaseling with fellow riders at the time. I switched to sticky strings and a CO2 inflator with a half dozen cartridges.
 
I never heard of this stuff, so I googled it. After I got past the first few hits about a Jackie Chan movie, I found their website, which begins: "Ride-On Tire Protection is a line of gel-like tire sealants . . . "

Thanks for the heads-up. Guess I'll pass.
 
Personally, I use mushroom plugs and a decased 12V pump from harbor freight. The reason I respond is that if you are a member of the American Motorcyclist Association, you can get free tows. Costs $49 a year. In 18 years as an AMA member, I have had to be towed 3 times. So, $275x3=825. 825/18=$45.83. So I overpay by $3.70. Not bad.

AAA towing won't cover a motorcycle unless you have the highest membership (I think its called RV Plus). Don't ask how I know!

Chad
Used AMA towing once and was advised by the tow company to get better insurance after paying the $200 overage. Found that my regular motorcycle insurance includes towing to the nearest repair facility up to 300 miles.
 
Blue? I carry sticky string and CO2 cartridges, chalk to mark the hole. Worked for all but the 2" crossways cut. I also buy a new tube of glue every year.
Have you considered an air compressor? I knew a guy once who could slow down a leak but not completely stop it. He ran out of cartridges before he could get back to civilization.

Slowing-but-not-stopping a leak happened to me once too but luckily I was properly prepared.

I use AMA towing one time for my bike. Cost me $0.00. They paid the guy $700 right then over the phone for my 80 mile tow.
 
"AAA towing won't cover a motorcycle unless you have the highest membership (I think its called RV Plus). Don't ask how I know!"

The highest version of AAA, supposedly including motorcycle coverage, is a waste of money. I have it and have called for a tow twice in 10 years. The first time they showed up after well over an hour with a full roll back, and I pushed the bike with a absolutely flat tire up the tilted bed and up to the front -- Not Fun -- they towed me home.
The second time the local tow outfit local to my dead bike called after well over an hour and said they were not capable of towing a bike and were not coming. They did share the phone number of a local dealer that would come and tow me back to the shop, for a separate fee, of course.
 
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