Push Pin Fasteners

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waynevb

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I've seen photos where it was done - but only on Gen I FJRs where you didn't need to move the ECU location. Also perhaps non-abs Gen I as that plumbing could get in the way. I *think* some police FJRs had dual battery systems with one under the seat. To change location would be a major ass-pain and not worth the effort IMHO. As for bleeding the rear brake, easy-peasy. What the heck were you removing to do it?
I removed the seat and the RH side panel. The RH panel has four of those stupid push pin connectors that disappear when you release them. The master cylinder is still half covered by a chassis member and the top was difficult to unscrew. Once the top is off you still have to pull on the mounting to get clearance to top it up. It could have easily been located under the seat with a slight longer hose.
 
I removed the seat and the RH side panel. The RH panel has four of those stupid push pin connectors that disappear when you release them. The master cylinder is still half covered by a chassis member and the top was difficult to unscrew. Once the top is off you still have to pull on the mounting to get clearance to top it up. It could have easily been located under the seat with a slight longer hose.
I never even found it a mild annoyance to access, empty and bleed the MC. I use a plastic (LDPE) disposable pipette to empty the reservoir first and wipe it out with a paper tower if there is any residue - this reduces the amount of fluid you have to pump through the system since you are starting with all fresh in the reservoir (same with clutch and front brakes). These are between 2 and 3 millilitres per squirt.
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A little fussier if you are removing the rear brake pivot to clean/lube - cotter pin and springs were a bit of a puzzle the first time.

It is still easier than replacing the air filter on the other side.
 
I never even found it a mild annoyance to access, empty and bleed the MC. I use a plastic (LDPE) disposable pipette to empty the reservoir first and wipe it out with a paper tower if there is any residue - this reduces the amount of fluid you have to pump through the system since you are starting with all fresh in the reservoir (same with clutch and front brakes). These are between 2 and 3 millilitres per squirt.
View attachment 6016

A little fussier if you are removing the rear brake pivot to clean/lube - cotter pin and springs were a bit of a puzzle the first time.

It is still easier than replacing the air filter on the other side.
Tell me how you deal with the plastic push-pin fasteners. Do you buy new ones?
 
Those push pins shouldn't "disappear when you release them". You take a thin allen key or something similar, push in the middle until there is a slight click, then you pull the whole thing out by pulling up on the base. You may need to slip something thin that won't scratch under the base to start it.
 
Tell me how you deal with the plastic push-pin fasteners. Do you buy new ones?
This was initially in the other thread and I see that mods (correctly) moved it to a new one. I copied my content to here and deleted my other post.

I assume you are talking about the ones where you push in the pin so it is recessed (as opposed to the type with the Phillips-like head). Pin is flush with the rivet initially.

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I typically use an Allen wrench or small screwdriver to push the pin in one notch. If you can access the bottom, you can easily push the whole rivet out. If not accessible, you can pull it out with a fingernail under the flange. When reinstalling, remove the pin completely and set the rivet in the hole. Insert the pin in from the top until it clicks flush with the flange. Photo above shows pin pushed in to the first stop for insertion - this works too as the only point where the rivet is expanded is when the top is flush. Pin is "captive" by the rivet in the outer position, when flush and when pushed in one notch. Pushing further will push the pin through so it can be reinserted from the top. Don't think I have ever ruined one although I did lose the pin somewhere in the bowels of the bike at one time.
Note: The ones on the inner front fairing are not all the same length!! Make sure you don't mix them up - it matters.

The screw head ones work pretty well but easier to damage. Best way is to rotate the "screw" a quarter to half turn counterclockwise and push out from below if accessible. You don't really even need a screwdriver to reinstall but if you do, don't twist too much.

Edit: I see @Whooshka already answered...
 
The screw head ones work pretty well but easier to damage. Best way is to rotate the "screw" a quarter to half turn counterclockwise and push out from below if accessible. You don't really even need a screwdriver to reinstall but if you do, don't twist too much.

Edit: I see @Whooshka already answered...
Over time I think I've replaced all the screw head ones with regular pushpin type. IMO easier in the long run.
 
Over time I think I've replaced all the screw head ones with regular pushpin type. IMO easier in the long run.
I haven't needed to replace any, but I agree that in most instances, the push pin type are easier to use and more secure. The screw head ones can back out.
 
I haven't needed to replace any, but I agree that in most instances, the push pin type are easier to use and more secure. The screw head ones can back out.
I've never had one back out nor have I ever heard anyone mentioning that one had. Non-existent problem IMHO. I replaced them simply so I don't need a screwdriver to remove them. I use the same dull punch or Allen wrench as I always do.
 
I've never had one back out nor have I ever heard anyone mentioning that one had. Non-existent problem IMHO. I replaced them simply so I don't need a screwdriver to remove them. I use the same dull punch or Allen wrench as I always do.
I have had three FJR's and never once had an issue with the Phillips head fasteners. I suspect the reason they would fail is because when re-setting them they are turned beyond what is needed. Kinda like stripping the threads!!
 
I've never had one back out nor have I ever heard anyone mentioning that one had. Non-existent problem IMHO. I replaced them simply so I don't need a screwdriver to remove them. I use the same dull punch or Allen wrench as I always do.
I always have my Swiss Army knife and the screwdriver/can opener blade works perfectly with the Phillips-type rivet fasteners. Doesn't damage the head with the very small amount of necessary torque and the (dull) blade part of the opener can be slipped under the flange to help get the rivet out if it can't be accessed to be pushed from behind (rarely necessary).
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I haven't had the screw-type back out to the point where the rivet is in danger of falling out but sometimes not as snug as I might prefer - especially the ones holding the side panels. Dirt gets into them and I think the original owners of both my Gen II bikes may have been a bit ham-fisted with a couple of them. I haven't lost any parts yet!
 
Hmmm. Maybe I’ve been doing it wrong all these years? For those Phillips head pop-rivets I’ve used a screw driver to pop the head up, then pry out the body. But for installing, with the head pre-popped up I always just push the rivet body in place, then push the Phillips head center part down flush. Always seemed to work fine that way.
 
Hmmm. Maybe I’ve been doing it wrong all these years? For those Phillips head pop-rivets I’ve used a screw driver to pop the head up, then pry out the body. But for installing, with the head pre-popped up I always just push the rivet body in place, then push the Phillips head center part down flush. Always seemed to work fine that way.
I find that they generally click in just fine for the most part using your method. Sometimes seem to need a bit of a clockwise twist (just thumb pressure, no screwdriver), especially if they are old/worn/dirty. As I said, I think the original owners of both my Gen II were a bit over-zealous with these resulting in some being less "snappy". Overall, I think I prefer the push-pin type. I haven't had either type fall out...
 
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