Is Yamalube 10 w 40 OK in Northern Illinois?

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Joined
Sep 20, 2023
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Location
Ottawa, IL 61350
guys, I changed the oil and filter yesterday and as I was tossing the empty bottles realized I'd purchased and filled the '06 with Yamalube 10 w 40. Full synth

the ambient here in No IL is 50-85 degrees for a few more weeks

yes. that's the question. thanx. ( sheepish / embarrassed emoji goes here)
 
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Thanx!!!!! I'm new to FJR world and needed to be certain.
For what its worth, I usually use a synthetic 5W40 non-motorcycle oil (but JASO MA/MA2 certified) in my current 2011 FJR with 100,000 miles. (And almost 200,000 miles on my '07, before I sold it.) Personally, I think any multigrade oil with the JASO cert (wet clutch compatible) and the second number 40 or 50 will be good. Some people claim that their bike may not "like" certain oils (notchy shifting for some) but I haven't had any issues. Certainly haven't experienced any evidence of unusual wear. Oil-related problems are extremely rare, unless someone chooses to use one with "energy-conserving" components which may cause slippage in a wet clutch. Stick with a quality oil with the appropriate certifications and avoid the use of "additives" which, at best, improve the performance of the seller's wallet.
 
guys, I changed the oil and filter yesterday and as I was tossing the empty bottles realized I'd purchased and filled the '06 with Yamalube 10 w 40. Full synth

the ambient here in No IL is 50-85 degrees for a few more weeks

yes. that's the question. thanx. ( sheepish / embarrassed emoji goes here)
Good choice. Shop manual for my 2010 specifies same. Except they omitted Full Synth.
 
guys, I changed the oil and filter yesterday and as I was tossing the empty bottles realized I'd purchased and filled the '06 with Yamalube 10 w 40. Full synth

the ambient here in No IL is 50-85 degrees for a few more weeks

yes. that's the question. thanx. ( sheepish / embarrassed emoji goes here)
What was the question?
 
I note the originator of this thread is in Ottawa and the climate there is far different than mine. My 2014 owners manual shows 10w40 and 10w50 recommended for the ambient temps where I live and generally ride. I had been using 10w40 until recently when I discovered 10w50 4T Castrol full synthetic motorcycle oil is a few $$'s cheaper than the same oil in 10w40. Why I have no idea.
 
I also run Shell Rotella T6, 5w-40 or 15w-40 but ideally 5W in the winter. Has the JASO stuff, good for motorcycles. Though when I shift from N to 1st gear it sounds like someone tossing a 10mm socket at the side of a toolbox. But so does my friend's 2022 with Motul oil...? Everything else is smooth, think it's 'just an FJR thang'.
 
I also run Shell Rotella T6, 5w-40 or 15w-40 but ideally 5W in the winter. Has the JASO stuff, good for motorcycles. Though when I shift from N to 1st gear it sounds like someone tossing a 10mm socket at the side of a toolbox. But so does my friend's 2022 with Motul oil...? Everything else is smooth, think it's 'just an FJR thang'.
That's an every manual-transmissioned motorcycle ever made kind of thing. If you have the patience, you can pull the clutch in 10-15 seconds before you attempt to shift into gear. That'll give the spinning mass of the cluster a bit of time to slow down a bit and give you a quieter gear engagement. Wait too long however, and it may be difficult to get it into gear when that cluster finally stops spinning.
 
That's an every manual-transmissioned motorcycle ever made kind of thing. If you have the patience, you can pull the clutch in 10-15 seconds before you attempt to shift into gear. That'll give the spinning mass of the cluster a bit of time to slow down a bit and give you a quieter gear engagement. Wait too long however, and it may be difficult to get it into gear when that cluster finally stops spinning.
Huh. Good to know. I know in neutral it's quieter and smoother when I pull the clutch in... I'll have to experiment
 
Huh. Good to know. I know in neutral it's quieter and smoother when I pull the clutch in... I'll have to experiment
Or just start it in gear (sidestand up and clutch pulled). Might get a small lurch if oil is cold...
"They all do that" generally applies although some seem worse than others. Temperature, oil and technique all play a role. Doesn't seem to hurt anything.
Do a search using terms such as "clunk" or "kerchunk"... (Discussed many times)

Search term "Kerchunk" yields almost 100 hits. "Clunk" has double that (although not all are related to shifting into 1st).
 
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Or just start it in gear (sidestand up and clutch pulled). Might get a small lurch if oil is cold...
"They all do that" generally applies although some seem worse than others. Temperature, oil and technique all play a role. Doesn't seem to hurt anything.
Do a search using terms such as "clunk" or "kerchunk"... (Discussed many times)
Yeah I pretty much always leave mine in gear. The 10mm to the side of a toolbox noise is just part of the charm to me at this point lol. I run the cheapest and oldest bike in my group so stuff like that is funny, as long as it doesn't break.
 
That's an every manual-transmissioned motorcycle ever made kind of thing. If you have the patience, you can pull the clutch in 10-15 seconds before you attempt to shift into gear. That'll give the spinning mass of the cluster a bit of time to slow down a bit and give you a quieter gear engagement. Wait too long however, and it may be difficult to get it into gear when that cluster finally stops spinning.
I found this to be the case quite by accident but routinely use the technique now...
 
I've been using Amsoil 20w50 in my bikes since the early 2000's, except for the bike I would ride in cold weather. I had a stable at one time. 10w40 will work for just about everyone year round except for our far north members who might like to drop to 5w30 (if you can ride in -22f you are a polar bear brrrrrrrrr).
 
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